Category Archives: evangelical christians

Church Based After School: At-Risk Kids Need . . .

Some of the things that at-risk kids need today to become who we want them to be at 40

SPIRITUAL

  • The truth of Jesus Christ taught at a level the child can understand and receive.
    • An adult willing to be vulnerable and honest in sharing Christ. No false promises.
    • The challenge to know God and know His power.
    • Insight into how biblical truth can be applied in all areas of life.
    • Kids need to know and understand Romans 8:28 — Jesus has a purpose for every-thing that happens.  Our challenge is to not waste the pain.
    • An adult committed to pray without ceasing that the child will be a seeker of truth, will have a gift of discernment along with the desire and strength to obey the truth.
  • Learn the power of prayer.
    • An adult who models and challenges praying without ceasing.
      • E.G. As a 12 year old, Jamal couldn’t read.  His SN asked Kim if she would pray for Jamal each day.  In return, the SN asked Jamal to pray for Kim. His response, “I’ve never done anything like that, but I’ll try.”  The following week his school teacher moved him into a remedial phonics program.  In two weeks he was reading everything.  (There was a follow-up discussion with Jamal that God doesn’t always answer in this way.)
      • Jamal also learned it isn’t just about him.  Kim, a suburban mother had pain for which she also needed prayer.
  • Learns how to function as a member of the body of Christ.
    • If they are to continue to walk with Jesus Christ into adulthood the Church must be essential in their lives. Most kids who are not connected to the Body of Christ tend to walk away from Christ in their twenties.

MENTAL

  • An adult who will not settle for a second class education for the child — will never give up in seeking the best.
  • Examples of not accepting second best.
    • One child was not able to learn at school due to learning disabilities.  The SN  began to home school her.  It has made a huge difference in the life of this preteen.
    • A child was continually failing at school, the parents weren’t able to get help from the school. The Secondary Nurturer began volunteering in the classroom and built a relationship with the teacher. Then together they went to the principal and the district psychologist and other specialists. Finally they got the long desired meeting with everyone together and the child got the help he needed.
    • A Secondary Nurturer had set up for a mom to meet with the committee who would decide what special aides would be provided for her son. On the way to the school (after leaving his second job) the Secondary Nurturer got a call from the principal telling him not to come because mom hadn’t shown up. The Secondary Nurturer went to the home and mom wasn’t there. He was walking to the car when she showed up, “Where have you been?” “Oh, I was shopping and we can do this another day,” she replied. Controlling his voice he calmly but forcefully said, “No, this is too important to delay. Your son’s life depends on this meeting. Get in the car we are going to the school.” At the school the principal said he didn’t know when he could get everyone back together. The Secondary Nurturer said that was fine they would sit in the office until everyone could meet. They sat there for several hours — but the meeting was successful.
  • Develop a respect for education.
  • Development of critical thinking skills.
  • An adult who provides opportunities through conversation and real life experiences where the child is challenged to think critically.
    • Tyrone was looking forward to purchasing the Lego Prehistoric Creatures today.  He had been saving his “money” for months. As he approached the store, the center director asked him, “Tyrone, have you bought your ticket for our trip to the snow next weekend?”  “No” came the reply.  “Do you want to go to the snow?” the director asked.  “Yes” Tyrone smiled.  “You better buy your ticket today or you won’t be able to go,” the director suggested.  “But I wanted to buy the Legos I’ve been saving for, and if I get my ticket I won’t have enough money for the Legos.  Will you loan me some money?”  The director laughed and told him the KidTrek Bank didn’t make loans.  The director helped Tyrone go through the process of critically thinking how the outcome would differ if he didn’t buy his ticket that day.  Yes, he would have to wait for the Legos, but they would still be there when he had earned more money; if he put off buying his ticket, he would miss the snow trip, and there wouldn’t be another one this year.

 EMOTIONAL

  • Opportunities to deal with feelings in a responsible manner.
  • Learns that feelings can be deceptive.
    • Learns how to handle feelings.
    • Learns importance of taking feelings to Source of all Truth.
  • The opportunity to deal with delayed gratification.
  • Guidance in healthy manner of receiving criticism/correction

 SOCIAL

  • A faithful adult willing to walk through stages of Trust, Autonomy, Initiative, Industry, and Identity.
  • Instruction in basic life skills – eating in a restaurant, making a bed, washing clothes, how to use a bathroom, etc.
  • Anger Management tools.
  • Instruction in all aspects of handling money.
  • The opportunity to have meaningful conversation around a meal several times a week.
  • Development of a work ethic.
    • Learns not to expect to receive without working for something.
    • Learns chores and responsibilities are a normal part of life.

 PHYSICAL

  • Child needs an adult who will be an advocate for and aware of the physical needs of the child.
  • Child needs to be taught hygiene.
  • Child needs to have the opportunity to develop a taste for healthy food.
  • This means if it is not provided in his home an adult needs to be in his life who will provide those opportunities.
  • Exercise a regular part of his life.

 ALL ENCOMPASSING

  • The opportunity to make and act on responsible choices.
  • An adult who will be there to assist in building a vision for the future.
    • Children of poverty often aren’t given a vision of the future because mom and dad are just trying to survive one day at a time.
  • Understanding that life does not appear fair today (Psalm 73) because we do not know how God is at work.
    • We cannot compare ourselves with others; we must walk the path God has called us to walk – Galatians 6: 4 & 5.
  • Hope 
    • Due to all of the above happening in his life.
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Christian After School Programs: Could Satan Be Tempting You With “Good” So You Will Disobey God?

If you are reading this you most likely have a desire to see justice for kids who are suffering. Read through the following and let me know what you think.

“And the devil took him up and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of time, and said to him, “To you I will give all this authority and their glory, for it has been delivered to me, and I give it to whom I will. If you, then, will worship me, it will all be yours.” And Jesus answered him, “It is written, “‘You shall worship the Lord your God, and him only shall you serve.’”(Luke 4:5-8 ESV)

 Good vs. God’s Will – if Jesus will bow to Satan then Satan will give Jesus authority. However, we know that Jesus’ destiny is to be King of kings and Lord of Lords (1 Timothy 6:15, Philippians 2:10-11). If Jesus had taken that authority, there would then have been no more war, sickness, evil on earth – but there also wouldn’t have been eternal salvation. The Father’s plan would have been thwarted – Jesus would have sinned.

Satan was offering Jesus to have immediate gratification, to bring immediate justice to all of earth. Why didn’t Jesus do it? Because if He had He would have disobeyed God the Father – that wasn’t the Father’s plan.

What is the temptation that Satan brings to those of us who have a heart for the poor?

Do you think it is possible to want to help the poor and in the end actually harm them?  Do you think that the poor can become an idol?  That we can in the end actually put them before God, all the while doing it in His name?

Jesus certainly told His followers that they must serve the poor – or else! Matthew 25:31-46

Then He said, the poor will always be with you.  What did He mean?
Mark 14:3-9

I’ve been pondering how these two scriptures fit together and have come to this conclusion looking at both passages in the context of the entire Bible.

We definitely have a responsibility to serve the poor and we will be held accountable if we don’t.  However, that does not excuse putting the poor before God Almighty.  We make the poor more important than God when in serving them we break God’s laws, or we twist His truth.

Just as the Israelites did at the foot of Mt Sinai, I’m seeing new gods created to fit each individual’s idea of who God is.  Rather than truth we want a god who will make us feel good. 

But the problem is that when we create this new god we are doing harm not only to ourselves but to those we want to serve.

God’s anger was great, “The Lord said to Moses, ‘I have seen this people, and behold, they are an obstinate people.  Now then let Me alone, that My anger may burn against them and that I may destroy them; and I will make of you a great nation.”  Ex. 32:9&10

Moses had to fight for the people so God wouldn’t destroy them – God’s anger was great.

Do you think He is any less angry when new gods are created today?  Even if we do it in the name of social justice?  Even though we call this new god Jesus? Placing the name of Jesus on this new god doesn’t make it God.

I believe God wants us to do BIBLICAL JUSTICE; He wants us to fight for justice – but under the banner of His truth.

Let me know what you think.

Christian After School Programs – What Is Cost Effective?

“Is this cost-effective?”

If you have read through this Blog very often you know that we recommend that in serving at-risk kids you have no more than a 1-5 ratio. That is one adult to every five children. I can’t tell you how many times I have been asked . . .

Aren’t you throwing money away by “walking with so few kids through life? 

And upon hearing this question, I am never sure if I want to cry or scream.

Realizing that if a church youth group, or a para-church outreach ministry, has 200 kids in their weekly ministry, but 10 years later only 5-10 of those kids are still “walking” with Christ…is that truly cost-effective?

Jesus himself did not spend the majority of his time with the masses…yes, he preached to them and did outreach type things with them…but the majority of his time was spent “mentoring” and “walking through life” with 12 men…more specifically three men (Peter, James and John) who were the ones God used to turn this world upside down.

So who are we to think we can do more, or better than God himself?

Would it not, in the long run, be more cost-effective to invest in a small number of children for a long period of time, seeing these children grow to be Christ-changed, hope-filled, productive adults who multiply themselves to the point they are changing everything around them?

From an investment standpoint, if I were investing in stocks, and I was only getting a 2-5% return on my investments I am not sure I would stick with them. Why is our investments in how we disciple children in youth any different?

What kind of return are you getting on your investment?

“…When the focus is on youth development, nearly 70% of young people in the most challenging of life’s conditions not only survive, but grow into thriving adults.” 
-Resiliency: What We Have Learned, Bonnie Benard

Now that is what I call getting “bang for your buck;” just imagine adding the power of God’s love to that? Wow!!

If you read the book you will learn that that 70% is based on 1 adult with a few children.

KidTrek: After School Programs – Healthy Snacks

  1. Veggies:  carrots, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, cherry tomatoes,cucumber, bell pepper — can be eaten with ranch dip, peanut butter, or bean spread
  2. Fruit:  apples, bananas, grapes, oranges, and seasonal fruit
  3. Applesauce, without added sugar, in small cups
  4. Mountain High vanilla yogurt – You would buy a large tub and dish it out.
  5. Apples with peanut butter
  6. Dried fruit – raisins, figs, dates, plums, apricots, cranberries, apples
  7. Purchase cookies that use canola oil at a health food store.
  8. Salad
  9. Nuts – Make sure that no one is allergic.
  10. Seeds
  11. Frozen foods: anything from Amy’sCo.- burritos, bananas, tofutti cuties, cut up veggie burritos (serve with pita bread), frozen waffles – Look at a health food store or most large supermarkets carry Amy’s products in their health food section.
  12. Juice popsicles – You make them.
  13. Puffins peanut butter cereal – Eat it dry. (Can be purchased at Trader Joe’s and Albertson’s.)
  14. Boiled eggs
  15. Granola
  16. Popcorn
  17. Pretzels
  18. Pita wedges with bean dip or a spinach/vegetable dip
  19. Make jello from juice – the recipe is on the box of Knox Gelatin
  20. Cheese
  21. Juices that are 100% juice – Stay away from the sugary juices.
  22. Rice cakes
  23. Plain yogurt and add honey, a little juice, or some fresh/frozen/dried fruit
  24. Healthy granola bars – Read the ingredients.
  25. Triscuits or other whole grain crackers
  26. Cottage Cheese
  27. For a treat, low fat Chocolate Milk English muffin pizzas with pineapple or tomato slice, mushrooms, etc.
  28. Baked potatoes with chili beans or broccoli and cheese
  29. Waffles topped with fresh fruit. Choose fruits that are in season
  30. Tortillas and beans
  31. Yogurt and fruit topped with cereal (yogurt sundaes)
  32. Raw vegetables cut into slices or sticks with a yogurt dip. (Mix your favorite dry salad dressing mix into plain yogurt to make a great tasting low-fat dip!)
  33. Trail mix made with several types of cereal, dried fruit and nuts or sunflower seeds
  34. Yogurt grahams. (Spread fruit-flavored yogurt on a graham cracker square, top with a second square. Wrap in plastic wrap and freeze.)
  35. chocolate covered bananas
  36. apples dipped in peanut butter
  37. celery with cheese spread
  38. whole wheat crackers with slices of ham and cheese
  39. nuts
  40. ice cream
  41. grilled cheese squares
  42. fruit salad
  43. ice cones with fruit juice
  44. whole wheat pretzels with cheese dip
  45. chopped carrots, celery, cucumbers with ranch dressing dip
  46. animal crackers
  47. Whole grain bagel with fruit jam
  48. hot apple bran muffins
  49. watermelon or cantaloupe
  50. home made pudding
  51. milkshakes, try adding blended fruit
  52. dried fruits, nature’s candy
  53. raisins or fresh grapes or strawberries with a little whipped cream dip
  54. Make your own individual pizza (use low fat cheese, whole-grain pizza crust, and lots of veggies for toppings.)
  55. Cereal with fruit and milk
  56. Tuna sandwich on whole-grain bread
  57. Peanuts and pretzels
  58. Macaroni and cheese (use an all-natural boxed variety such as Annie’s)
  59. Apple and banana slices spread with peanut butter
  60. Popcorn and homemade soda (mix seltzer with 100-percent fruit juice)
  61. Hot chocolate made with milk
  62. Mixed fruit that’s already cut up and ready for eating
  63. Ready-to-eat, cut-up veggies, including carrot sticks, pepper strips, cucumbers and cherry tomatoes, and low-fat dip
  64. Leftovers from dinner the night before, such as cold chicken and pasta
  65. Homemade whole-grain muffins containing fruit or veggies, such as carrot, blueberry or zucchini (Make them using vegetable oil and low-fat milk.)
  66. Low-fat cheese and whole-grain crackers, served with fruits and/or veggies.
  67. Milk shakes made with non-fat milk and non-fat frozen yogurt.
  68. Tortilla filled with shredded low-fat cheese and salsa, warmed in microwave
  69. Veggie burger
  70. Low-fat luncheon meat rolled around a carrot stick or cucumber spear
  71. For beverages at snack time, serve milk, 100-percent juice, or water. Avoid sports drinks or sodas that provide calories but little else.
  72. Veggie Munchies from Health is Wealth,
  73. Select only juices that are 100 percent juice
  74. Cubed cheese – they come in bags already cut up

Frozen Yogurt Cups

Serves: 3 to 4
Prep time: 5 to 10 minutes
Freezing time: 1 to 2 hours

 Ingredients:

  • 8-ounce container of your favorite flavor of yogurt

Utensils:

  • small paper cups
  • wooden popsicle sticks (available in craft stores)
  • plastic wrap

Directions:

  1. Pour yogurt into paper cups.  Fill them almost to the top.
  2. Stretch a small piece of plastic wrap across the top of each cup.
  3. Using the popsicle stick, poke a hole in the plastic wrap.  Stand the stick straight up in the center of the cup.
  4. Put the cups in the freezer until the yogurt is frozen solid.
  5. Remove the plastic wrap, peel away the paper cup, and eat your pop!

Ants On A Log

Serves: 2
Prep time: 5 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 celery sticks
  • peanut butter
  • raisins

Utensils:

  • knife

Directions:

  1. Wash the celery and cut it into pieces.  Each piece should be about 5 inches long.
  2. Spread peanut butter in u-shaped part of celery, from one end to the other.
  3. Press raisins gently into peanut butter.
  4. Enjoy your ants on a log!

Healthy Nachos

Make a great taco chip dip by melting a cup of Monterey Jack cheese (or a mixture of whatever cheeses you have on hand) in a Pyrex measuring cup and adding 1/4 cup of store-bought mild salsa.

Fun Mixture

  • Buy pumpkin, sunflower, and sesame seeds, granola, nuts, and dried fruits (in bulk, if available).
  • Let the kids combine the ingredients to make their own trail mixes.
  • Variety is important, as it enables the kids to explore different tastes.
  • They can make up several packets to be used over several weeks by wrapping in foil or colored cellophane.
  • Next week they can try each other’s mixes.

Fruit Snacks

  • Spread spicy cheddar cheese mixture on apple slices
  • Banana sandwiches with cream cheese and granola filling

 Cracker Pizzas

  • Top crackers with pizza sauce and cheese and melt under the broiler

Kids’ Choice

  • Take a six-cupcake tin and put a different treat in each cupcake spot.
  • Some choices include:

◘    cheese cubes
◘     vegetables,
◘    cereal,
◘    raisins or fruit,
◘    yogurt,
◘    pretzels,
◘    crackers,
◘    nuts, pieces of bagel etc.

Slushies Aren’t Just for Summer

In a blender, combine half 100 percent fruit juice and half water with unthawed, unsweetened frozen fruit. Pour into fun cups.

Dip Sticks

Take a variety of celery, carrots and cucumbers. Clean vegetables thoroughly. Pour a small amount of light or fat-free salad dressing into an unbreakable container and dip vegetables.

Mud and Crackers

Low-fat graham crackers dipped in chocolate pudding make for a wonderful snack. For added variety, try vanilla or other flavors of pudding.

An Apple a Day…

Serve applesauce with a sprinkle of cinnamon and nutmeg and two teaspoons of dried fruit.

Rice Cake Stackers

Rice cakes stacked with bananas make great afternoon snacks.

KidTrek After School Programs: Church Based – Helping Kids Develop A Love For Learning

The purpose of tutoring is to give the kids supplemental material that will enhance their educational experience.  Sometimes this will mean helping them catch up to the average student.

The goal is to see them go above and beyond what they have done before.

Your kids have probably struggled throughout their school experience – they hate school.

Your challenge is to give them a love for learning.

It may mean that you have to go the extra mile you have to give up doing what you want to do for yourself because you are giving to the kids.

Jacob hated school so much he just stopped going.

His Secondary Nurturer, Jim, used his vacation time to spend two weeks going to school with Jacob every day.

Sitting in the back of the room throughout the day Jim learned why Jacob hated school. The teacher was MEAN! There is no other word to describe this man who emotionally “tortured” the kids. The kids had no voice – this was a school for troubled kids. Every school day was a time of tension – not exactly an atmosphere in which kids can learn.

Jim spoke to the principal and the teacher was worked with.

It is amazing the changes that happen when the school knows that there are “outsiders” who are interested in the kids. Jim actually had a school principal, in another situation, tell him that what she was going to do for a kid she wouldn’t do if it was a parent asking.

To assist  you in the beginning stages of setting up your tutoring program is the PDF below. There are suggestions for 14 days of activities – then repeat those activities and you have your first month. If you need  help with some of the suggestions write me – wanda@kidtrek.org.

14 DAYS OF TUTORING ACTIVITIES

After School Programs:Church Based – A Family Service Plan

“When you fail to plan
You plan to fail”
Author Unknown

It is important that we are intentional as we minister to at-risk kids and their families.

Intentionality requires planning.

In the PDF below you will find a tool to assist you plan what services you will provide a family. It will take you through a step by step process to assess what each individual family requires for lasting change.

Do not attempt to work with more than one family in this intense manner until you have developed the policies that are unique to your church.

Remember that everything begins with the building of relationship. Read last week’s post – Be Mom’s Best Friend.

A Family Service Plan

If you are a Children’s Pastor with struggling families within your church consider using this tool to come alongside of them.

If you want to use this tool to train staff write me  for the Staff Pages.
The above PDF is from the KidTrek Directors’ Training Manual.

wanda@kidtrek.org

COMING NEXT WEEK:

A Tutoring Plan

After School Programs: Church Based – What At-Risk Kids Receive From Secondary Nurturers

Third in series on “What At Risk Kids Need.”

Last week we looked at the training that Secondary Nurturers need in order to be equipped so the kids will receive the following.

  • The truth of Jesus Christ taught at a level the child can understand and receive.
    • No false promises.
    • Learns Jesus has a purpose for every-thing that happens.  Our challenge is to not waste the pain.
    • The vulnerability and honesty of the SN in sharing Christ leads the child to discover the immense love of Jesus.
    • The challenge to know God and know His power.
    • Insight into how biblical truth can be applied in all areas of life.
  • Learns the power of prayer.
    • As a 12 year old, Jamal couldn’t read.  His SN asked Kim if she would pray for Jamal each day.  In return, the SN asked Jamal to pray for Kim. His response, “I’ve never done anything like that, but I’ll try.”  The following week his school teacher moved him into a remedial phonics program.  In two weeks he was reading everything.  (There was a follow-up discussion with Jamal that God doesn’t always answer in this way.)
    • Jamal also learned it isn’t just about him.  Kim, a suburban mother had pain for which she also needed prayer.
  • Learns how to function as a member of the body of Christ.
  • Development of critical thinking skills.
    • Kids receive specially designed “money” for attendance, bringing homework, behavior, participation, etc.  They learn how to write checks, deposit money in the “bank,” and tithe.  They have the opportunity to purchase items in the store each week.  Store items may be food, hygiene items, toys, books, games, potential gift items.  Kids “pay” to attend all activities outside of the center.
    • Tyrone was looking forward to purchasing the Lego Prehistoric Creatures today.  He had been saving his “money” for months. As he approached the store, the center director asked him, “Tyrone, have you bought your ticket for our trip to the snow next weekend?”  “No” came the reply.  “Do you want to go to the snow?” the director asked.  “Yes” Tyrone smiled.  “You better buy your ticket today or you won’t be able to go,” the director suggested.  “But I wanted to buy the Legos I’ve been saving for, and if I get my ticket I won’t have enough money for the Legos.  Will you loan me some money?”  The director laughed and told him the KidTrek Bank didn’t make loans.  The director helped Tyrone go through the process of critically thinking how the outcome would differ if he didn’t buy his ticket that day.  Yes, he would have to wait for the Legos, but they would still be there when he had earned more money; if he put off buying his ticket, he would miss the snow trip, and there wouldn’t be another one this year.
  • The opportunity to deal with delayed gratification.
  • Instruction in all aspects of handling money.
  • The opportunity to make and act on responsible choices.
  • A respect for education.
  • A vision for the future.
  • The opportunity to have meaningful conversation around a meal several times a week.
  • An education.
    • Most times it will be homework assistance and tutoring that is needed,  supplementing the school experience
    • One child was not able to learn at school due to learning disabilities.  The SN  began to home school her.  It has made a huge difference in the life of this preteen.
  • Development of a work ethic.
    • Learns not to expect to receive without working for something.
    • Learns chores and responsibilities are a normal part of life.
  • Opportunities to deal with feelings in a responsible manner.
  • Instruction in basic life skills – eating in a restaurant, making a bed, washing clothes, how to use a bathroom, etc.
  • Guidance in healthy manner of receiving criticism/correction.
  • A faithful adult willing to walk through stages of Trust, Autonomy, Initiative, Industry, and Identity.
  • Understanding that life does not appear fair today (Psalm 73) because we do not know how God is at work.
    • We cannot compare ourselves with others; we must walk the path God has called us to walk – Galatians 6: 4 & 5.
  • Understanding that feelings can be deceptive.
    • Learns how to handle feelings.
    • Learns importance of taking feelings to Source of all Truth.
  • Hope as adults, primary-nurturer/secondary-nurturer/Service Partners, work together to improve the family’s life situation.
  • Vision of a future that can be his/hers – unique to the individual kid.

The following is from a Secondary-Nurturer who has walked through life with her kids for the last four years.  She has had a lot of ups and downs, but remained faithful. She has gotten up early to take a dad to work when his car broke down; she has looked for kids on the streets when they weren’t showing up; she made her home a refuge for kids.  She ministers not only to the five kids with whom she works; she also ministers to mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles and grandparents. They know she is someone to trust.

We tell the kids that everything they learn, whether knowledge or skill, is something they will need to draw upon later in life. I don’t think they understand or believe this.

Last week Blanca and Henry interviewed for their first part-time job. It is only for three weeks but it is with the city helping weed and clean up the parks. The money comes from a grant for low-income kids. They both commented on how easy the interview was, basically if you show up you get the job.  I explained to them how often kids in the neighborhood don’t show up for jobs and that is why they have the pre-interview to see who is serious about work.  Two years ago, we helped a kid we know get one of these jobs, but he only showed up twice. He is almost 18 and has yet to finish anything.

I reminded them of the kids who showed up for the interview looking scared.  Blanca and Henry have had the advantage of public speaking and working with our drama teacher. The kids and parents give me a hard time about being early or on time.  At their interviews the kids were asked about whether they could be counted on to be on time. It reminded them that maybe I am not crazy after all.

Then they were asked what kind of skills they had with garden and wood tools.  Blanca and Henry have worked with me in my garden, worked with rose bushes, and removed rocks from my garden. They also have learned about wood working. In the interview they had some great experiences to share. The average inner city kid doesn’t have these experiences, nor do they have the work ethic developed like Blanca and Henry.

In my world, those are huge things, though often taken for granted because they are just part of being a productive adult. In the inner city they are huge because these are typically learned during childhood, and they fail as adults without them.

When I first started in ministry I thought the goal was to raise good, godly kids; now I realize the goal is to raise great and godly adults. This is a huge difference. You can have good kids but that doesn’t mean they will be prepared for adulthood or be great and godly adults. We have to look beyond the now and look for positive outcomes.

What are we teaching them that will make their generation different from their ancestors?